Holy Week & Easter

Join us for Holy Week & Easter 

as we celebrate the life, death & resurrection
of our Lord Jesus Christ! 

SUNDAY OF PALM AND PASSION

April 1 at 10:30 a.m.
includes Procession with Palms and Holy Communion

MAUNDY THURSDAY

April 5 at 7 p.m.
with Footwashing and Holy Communion

GOOD FRIDAY

April 6 at 10:30 a.m.

HOLY SATURDAY:
THE GREAT VIGIL OF EASTER

April 7 at 8 p.m.

EASTER SUNDAY:
THE RESURRECTION OF OUR LORD

April 8 at 10:30 a.m.
Festival Service of Holy Communion

Ash Wednesday and the Beginning of Lent

Lent

Journey together with Christ to the cross where our sin is put to death, and to the empty tomb,
where we are given new life in the risen Christ.

Lent is from an Anglo-Saxon word meaning “springtime” and so is to be understood as the holy springtime of the soul, a time for preparation, planting, and growth. Like the father of the prodigal son (this story is one of the Lenten gospel readings, next year), God the Father invites us to return home.  Lent is a time for self-examination and repentance, but repentance always understood in its most graceful sense:  a turning away from death, and death-dealing habits and lifestyles, and a turning toward life, the abundant life given in Jesus Christ our Lord.

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Advent Candle Lighting: Third Sunday of Advent

On the first Sunday in Advent, we lit a candle for Hope.
Last Sunday, the second Sunday in Advent, we lit a candle for Peace.
Today we light a candle for Joy.
As this flame begins to burn, O God,
let the Joy and the Wonder of your Child
sing in our hearts and let our voices share the song of the Angels –
the song of heaven on earth.
Let your Spirit sing in our hearts;
let your Song of Joy fill our world;
and as we wait through the Advent season for the baby Jesus’ birth,
let the glorious Angels lead us to the place
where the Christ would be born today.   Amen.

Advent Candle Lighting: Second Sunday of Advent

Advent Candle Lighting

On the first Sunday in Advent, we lit a candle for Hope.
Today we light a candle for Peace.
As the flame of peace begins to burn, let our hearts be touched, O God,
by your Sacred Spirit who comes to us now as the Holy child of Peace.
Let us listen, O God, for your Spirit in the silence…

Let your Spirit burn in our hearts;
let your Light shine in our world;
and as we wait through the Advent season for the baby Jesus’ birth,
let your ribbon of Peace draw us together into a circle of love
where the Christ can be born today. Amen.

Advent Candle Lighting: First Sunday of Advent

This past Sunday, we celebrated the beginning of Advent, a time for us to expectantly wait for the coming of Christ. The first candle of our Advent wreath was lit.

A Candle for Hope

We light a candle for Hope.
As the flame of hope begins to burn, let the promise of the ages shine in our hearts as the great star shone so long ago in Bethlehem.
Let us listen, O God, for your Spirit in the silence (Silence is kept here).
Let your Spirit burn in our hearts; let your Light shine in our world;
and as we wait through the Advent season for the baby Jesus’ birth,
let your star of Hope lead us to the place where the Christ would be born today. Amen.

From the Bishop: Thanksgiving

an excerpt from article, How’s your fig tree?
published in the October Edition of the Rupert’s Land News
written by The Right Reverend Donald  Phillips, Bishop of Rupert’s land 

The Power of Thanksgiving

At the time we celebrate Harvest Thanksgiving in our Churches, even if we’re university students, chartered accountants, sales clerks, teachers, stay-at-home parents or politicians, we can bring a pumpkin, a jar of preserves, some corn stalks or a few pounds of potatoes to decorate our worship space, and still l  see ourselves, symbolically, thanking God for our lives and for all of the people and things in our lives for which we feel blessed.

But what do we do when we have hardship?

But what do we do when we have hardship?
What does the person who has recently lost their job do?  What about those who have just lost a parent or spouse, or even one of their children? What happens when one looks at their life and sees mostly difficulties, worries, and threatening circumstances for which they, definitely, are not thankful?

In the Old Testament there is a small piece of writing attributed to the prophet Habakkuk which addresses the dark and threatening times for the people of Israel and Judah in the 7th and 6th centuries BCE. After it describes the perilous existence of the people it closes with these words, “Though the fig tree does not blossom, and no fruit is on the vines; though the produce of the olive fails, and fields yield no food; though the flock is cut off from the fold, and there is no herd in the stalls, yet will I rejoice in the Lord; I will exult in the God of my salvation.”  What is this speaker claiming? It seems totally absurd! They are strongly asserting that even if there is no evidence of things for which to give thanks, they will resolutely continue to offer thanksgiving to God – the source of their life.

Is this a kind of fundamental denial – a self-imposed blindness toward reality in the hopes that this kind of attitude might serve as a “painkiller” to help them cope? Or, as some people of faith actually claim, are they holding on to a faint hope that if they just thank the Supreme Being vigorously enough that One will intervene and bring some changes to the fortunes of their lives – turn their situation around for the better?

They refuse to be discouraged by what they are experiencing,
God’s providence will ultimately prevail –
regardless of their present circumstances.

I don’t believe this is what the prophet is proclaiming.  Instead, the speaker of these words is reaching into the depths of their loving knowledge, trust and faith in the God who loves and saves them.  And with that trusting faith, they are able to look under, over and beyond their present circumstances and realize that ultimately they belong to God and that this world does too. Even in their present hardship, God is present and giving them life. They refuse to be discouraged by what they are experiencing, and in their resolute insistence on the goodness of God, they are asserting that God and God’s providence will ultimately prevail – regardless of their present circumstances.

Therein lies the power of thanksgiving.  This is the spiritual life we are to be cultivating whether or not our “fig trees” have done well!

Did you know?: Lent

The Colour of Lent

The church often uses colours for seasons. The colour for Lent is purple, which means both sorrow for the things we have done to hurt God and others, and royalty for our sovereign Jesus Christ.

Palm Sunday Service

Join us at the Cathedral, tomorrow morning at 10:30 for Palm Sunday as we celebrate the royal entrance our King, Jesus into Jerusalem!

The next day the great crowd that had come to the festival heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. So they took branches of palm trees and went out to meet him, shouting, ‘Hosanna! Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord—the King of Israel!’
John 12:12, 13

Did you know?: Lent

Maundy Thursday

In the past the King or Queen would wash the feet of poor people on Maundy Thursday to remind them of Jesus washing the feet of his friends, the disciples.

This interesting fact has been taken from LiveLent.net.

Buy your tickets for Seder Supper

Join us for Maundy Thursday as we remember the Last Supper by sharing a meal together. Pick up your $10 ticket at the church office or from the priest at any of the Main Street Corridor parishes.

Seder Supper with Holy Eucharist and Foot/Hand-Washing
Thursday, April 21 at 6:00 p.m.
St. Martin-in-the-Fields Anglican Church
160 Smithfield Avenue
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