PWRDF Celebrates 60 Years

The following letter excerpts were received this week from Will Postma, Executive director, PWRDF:

Dear friends in Christ,

‘On October 23, 1958, a devastating mine disaster occurred in Springhill, Nova Scotia. Anglicans in Canada responded quickly and overwhelmingly, joining together as a Church to offer prayer, support and funds. Sixty years later, volunteers and donors are still supporting PWRDF’s work, living out their Baptismal covenant to seek a truly just, healthy and peaceful world.

It all starts in the pews and parish halls. I am grateful for the many prayer breakfasts, pancake suppers and talent shows; the tireless efforts of Anglican Church Women and Outreach Committees and the enthusiasm of youth groups and Sunday Schools across Canada who are all engaged our work.’

…The Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) is the Anglican Church of Canada’s agency for sustainable development and relief. Through the support of Anglican parishes across Canada, PWRDF makes financial and human resources available to partners around the world working to improve health, food security and livelihoods for vulnerable people. https://pwrdf.org/.

PWRDF is celebrating 60 years of commitment and connection. It has created the e-book ‘People, Partners and Progress: 60 Stories for 60 Years’. To read or download the e-book, go to https://pwrdf.org/ .

Also available for viewing on the https://pwrdf.org/ webite is the moving video ‘At Home with PWRDF’. We invite you to check it out.

The Convening Circular for the 115th Session of the Synod of the Diocese of Rupert’s Land June 16, 2018

Electoral Synod at Cathedral Church of St. John the Evangelist, Winnipeg – Saturday, 16 June 2018 Anno Domini

Through the link below you will find the Convening Circular for the Electoral Synod being convened for the
purpose of electing a Bishop coadjutor for the Diocese of Rupert’s Land. The Synod will be held on
Saturday, June 16, 2018 at St. John’s Cathedral, 135 Anderson Avenue, Winnipeg. Registration will
open at 8:00 am with the synod convening at 9:30 am.
The Convening Circular contains:
• a list of the eligible clergy and elected lay delegates;
• Bishop’s Letter:
o information on how to make further nominations;
o information on voting procedures;
• an alphabetical listing of the nominees for Bishop Coadjutor, along with their CV, a photo, a link
to a video each has produced, and their response to eight questions posed by the Search
Committee.

A series of Town Hall meetings has been arranged throughout the Diocese for those who wish to gather and view the videos with other delegates, or those who do not have access to a computer. These meetings are open to all members of the Diocese, but are not mandatory for any to attend.

The following are the meeting dates and locations:

  • Monday 28th May, 7pm St Aidans, 274 Campbell Street, Winnipeg
  • Tuesday 29th May, 7pm St Mary Magdalene, 3 St. Vital Road, Winnipeg
  • Tuesday 29th May, 7pm  St Mary la Prairie, 36 2nd Street S.W. Portage la Prairie,
  • Wednesday 30th May, 7pm St Stephen, 220 Helmsdale Avenue, Winnipeg
  • Thursday 31st May, 7pm Christ Church, 227 McLean Avenue, Selkirk.
  • Saturday 2nd June, 10am All Saints, 175 Colony Street, Winnipeg
  • Saturday 2nd June, 11 am St Alban, 312 Main Street S., Kenora

Please hold this process in prayer! Pray for nominees, for the delegates who have been charged with the
responsibility to elect the Bishop coadjutor for Rupert’s Land. Pray for wisdom and guidance of the Holy
Spirit in this process.

http://www.rupertsland.ca/about/synod-2018/

 

Rest in peace, Nikki Hallett, beloved sister in Christ, beloved daughter of the Creator

Nicole Patricia Hallett (Nikki), beloved daughter of God her Creator, slept away quietly on Friday afternoon at Seven Oaks Hospital, with loving family around her.  Nikki was born on January 31st, 1978, and died far too soon on March 23rd, 2018.  
At her request, her funeral will be held at St. John’s Anglican Cathedral, 135 Anderson Avenue, in the North End of Winnipeg, where she, with Jaden and Todd had found a welcome place.  The funeral will begin at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, March 28th, with viewing available beginning at 9:30 a.m.  Nikki will be cremated, also at her request, with committal at a later date.  She asked ‘Rev Paul’ to do the service, and he is most honoured to do so.
Her own family will provide a light lunch following the service and hopes you can stay for a time of conversation and mutual consolation; her Cathedral family is also honoured to serve coffee and tea and juice.  We grew to love her and her children, and to appreciate the beautiful person she was, the strong woman, the adoring mother fierce in her love for her children, Joshua, Jaden, and Todd (TJ).
There is street parking available on most streets around the Cathedral; all the gates will be open.  Please, no general parking on the driveway.  We need to keep the building accessible to ambulances and fire trucks.  There are several handicapped slots and you are always welcome to drop off people at the Tower Door, and then park your car on the streets.  Thank you!
May she rest in the peace of Christ and rise in glory.

Requiescat in pace – Barbara Anne Swanson (nee Roberts)

BARBARA ANNE SWANSON (nee ROBERTS) Gentle, loving wife to George, beloved daughter, sister, aunt and loyal friend died on November 16, 2017, at the Selkirk Regional Health Centre, at the age of 73. Her funeral will be held on Wednesday, November 22, at 2:00 p.m. in Christ Church Anglican, 237 McLean Ave., Selkirk, MB.  The Rev. Brian Ford will preside, assisted by The Very Rev. Paul N. Johnson, both of St. John’s Anglican Cathedral, Winnipeg.

Eldest daughter of Alf and Elsie Roberts, she spent her childhood in Sherridon and Lynn Lake. She graduated from Grace Hospital and nursed in many places over the years. Barb enjoyed sharing life with her numerous friends. Her nieces and nephews always held a special place in her heart. Later in life, she married George, sharing many happy times, travelling and enjoying nature. Oak Hammock Marsh was a favourite place to walk with Casey and Angel. Predeceased by father Alf, and brother Paul. She is remembered with love by George, stepson Darren (Lindsay), mother Elsie, siblings Bill, Dave (Mariann), Ted (Janet), Ruth and Mary Jo (David), sister-in-law Jan (Paul), and many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Barb’s life was filled with numerous challenges which she faced with grace, courage, and fortitude. Her deep Christian faith sustained her right to her end. Donations towards a memorial feature will be welcomed by “Oak Hammock Interpretive Centre” in Barbara’s name.

Condolences may be left at http://www.gilbartfuneralhome.com Gilbart Funeral Home, Selkirk in care of arrangements.
Publish Date: Nov 21, 2017

Dean Bob Osborne, a Canoe, and a Canal (Rideau)

Our former Dean and Rector, The Very Rev. Bob Osborne, shared these pictures of his canoe trip in June, the length of the Rideau Canal.  Bob is blessed to be enjoying good health in his retirement.

Bob writes:  “In 1967 Centennial Year I was part of the Diocese of Algoma “Montreal Brigade” 39 of us canoed from the Diocesan camp located on the North Channel of Lake Huron.  We canoed up the French River, crossed Lake Nippising, portaged to Trout lake and then on to the Mattawa River where it finally joins the Ottawa River. We then canoed on to Ottawa and Montreal. This year my canoeing project was a bit more modest. Together with Rob Hubbard, our daughter’s father in law we canoed the Rideau River system from Kingston to Ottawa a distance of 202 km. It was a 9 day trip in which we camped out each evening at one of the locks which have lovely camping sites for canoeists. We canoed in the retirement gift of the Cathedral a cedar/canvas canoe that I was able to build with a canoe builder in Lorette. It is a great joy to canoe in with the many memories it brings of  our ministry at the Cathedral.”

If you wish to see more pictures, use this link:  https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMVF44uwneffOs0QESvpJoNarB3hrOWkyGapX_NpjxagWE0JuUE7fcPZ1kZTOMf9w?key=d080M0dUSU5jNjNFa2FoMVRGSFlTVU52b3ZtUTJB

Down for the count: City of Winnipeg losing battle against Dutch elm disease (our churchyard also)

Thursday, July 27, 2017
Reprinted from the Winnipeg Free Press:

When Robert Orr looks out at his Kingston Crescent neighbourhood, he feels as if he’s watching it die.

The tree canopy where he’s lived since 1995 is withering before his eyes, just one casualty in the city’s battle against Dutch elm disease.

And the situation is getting worse.

“If it keeps going like this, it won’t be the neighbourhood I moved into,” said the soft-spoken, 61-year-old retired teacher.

“It’ll be completely different,” Orr continued. “The trees really are such an important part of the fabric of this neighbourhood.”

In the area where he lives, hundreds of elm trees have been lost in the past decade. City statistics show that 5,500 trees are lost to the disease each year.

When one of Orr’s neighbours moved to Kingston Crescent in 1975, he had 27 elm trees on his property. Now, he has none. Orr and his partner had eight when they first moved to the neighbourhood. This summer, their last tree was infected.

“One doesn’t have to be a tree lover to realize there are some very practical concerns here,” Orr said.

“We’re down to our last one, which now has the disease. Two doors down, our neighbours have two with the disease. The tree directly across from our house in the park now has the disease.”

Dutch elm disease spreads through the fungus carried on the backs of elm bark beetles. They lay eggs in elm trees in the spring, which go on to hatch and mature throughout summer before a new generation is born in the fall.

When diseased trees are not removed quickly – ideally during the summer they are infected – the disease spreads.

Orr is frustrated by what he views as the city’s lack of political will to shut down the disease.

Since the summer of 2016, he says he’s witnessed the city losing the fight. He says not only has the tagging of infected trees slowed down, but so has their removal.

Martha Barwinsky, the city’s forester, admits they’ve fallen behind in efforts to remove diseased trees, but says they continue to tag them on schedule.

They do the best they can with the resources they have, she says.

“There are currently 970 trees marked last year that still need to be removed,” she said. “We’re removing them, but we’re still behind.”

The city has more than 230,000 adult American elm trees, which makes it the largest standing population in North America.

But, Barwinsky says they are at a critical point in trying to protect the city’s tree canopy.

“It’s a real concern,” she said. “We have to catch up and get these trees removed and come up with a better model for removing diseased trees earlier.”

Another concern is the arrival of the Emerald ash borer beetle, which isn’t a matter of if, but when, Barwinsky said. The fear is it could coincide with the city battling Dutch elm disease, thus further dividing their resources.

If their arrival isn’t properly attacked, it could result in the death of all ash trees in Winnipeg. Once they arrive, she added, they’re here to stay.

The city currently has 16 to 20 people working on surveying trees and is rerouting funds from tree planting to go toward the removal of diseased trees.

That, in Orr’s opinion, is a disastrous and short-sighted strategy.

“So just at the time we’re losing a lot of trees, they’re going to cut back on planting,” he said. “That is a terrible, misguided way of thinking.”

Orr tries his best to do his part by talking to his neighbours, calling 311 about diseased trees and writing letters to Trees Winnipeg and his city councillor. But he recognizes his efforts are limited and says he often receives no response from authorities.

He thinks the city needs to boost funding to the department that fights tree disease.

“We need to do something differently or we’re going to lose the canopy,” he said. “Politicians need to be talking about this, educating people and encouraging them to plant trees. We need to get at the removal of all these diseased elm trees before it’s too late.”

ryan.thorpe@freepress.mb.ca

From the Dean:

We have planted quite a few trees in the past three or four years, as part of our ongoing reclamation of the Cemetery, where we have lost far too many trees over the years, mostly American Elm, but also some big Maple trees to age; we are continuing this process and you can contribute if you’d like to do so.  We are asking for $200 to be given to the Cathedral and we will plant a tree in honour or in memory of the person of your choice.  If you are interested please call Carol in the Office at 204.586.8385, or e-mail her at <office@stjohnscathedral.ca>, and she can give you more details; thanks for considering this.

 

 

Honouring the Spirit of 1817 – Commemorating the Selkirk Treaty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Committee to Commemorate
the 200th Anniversary of The Selkirk Treaty

MEDIA RELEASE

Winnipeg – June 7, 2017

It’s the first Treaty signed in Western Canada and it was signed before there even was a Canada. It marks the beginning of the relationship between First Nations and the Crown in Western Canada. It cemented the friendship between Lord Selkirk and Chief Peguis. It shaped not only Winnipeg and Manitoba but also the nation itself. Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk, and five Indigenous chiefs, led by Chief Peguis, put pen to paper 200 years ago on July 18, 1817 at Lord Selkirk’s Hudson’s Bay Company post – Fort Douglas – on what is now Waterfront Drive. It’s known as “The Selkirk Treaty” and it conforms to the spirit of the Royal Proclamation of 1763, which provided a constitutional framework for Indigenous land entitlement and has been referred to as ‘Canada’s Indian Magna Carta’. Although it made the Red River Settlement possible, and the original document is housed here in Winnipeg at the Hudson’s Bay Archives, very few of us even know about it.

That is about to change.

In today’s spirit of reconciliation, a committee of 35 volunteers representing over 20 Indigenous and settler organizations is “Honouring The Spirit of 1817 – Commemorating The Selkirk Treaty”. The committee is co-chaired by Bill Shead of Peguis First Nation and John Perrin of The Scottish Heritage Council of Manitoba. Our committee wants to raise public awareness and honour the visionary leadership and friendship of Chief Peguis and Lord Selkirk leading to the signing of the 1817 Treaty. And although it must be acknowledged the settler community failed to honour the full intent of the Treaty in the future, in agreeing to its terms Peguis and Selkirk promoted peace, order and a spirit of mutual assistance and cooperation that is at the foundation of Manitoba’s unique history.

To mark this 200th Anniversary the committee has planned numerous events revolving around a visit to Manitoba of the current Lord Selkirk of Douglas, who has accepted an invitation from First Nations and Scottish and other settler organizations represented by the committee. There will be an array of free public events running from Sunday July 16 through Saturday July 22 in Winnipeg, Selkirk, St. Boniface and at St. Peter’s Reserve and the Peguis and Brokenhead First Nations. Details about specific events will be released over the next few weeks.

In addition to Chief Peguis and Lord Selkirk, the Chiefs signing the Treaty were:

MACHE WHESEAB,
Le Sonnant.
MECHKADDEWIKONAIE,
La robe noire.
KAYAJIESKEBINOA,
L’Homme Noir.
OUCKIDOAT,
Le Premier.

For information please contact:

Bill Shead, Committee Co-Chair
wshead@mts.net

John Perrin, Committee Co-Chair
jdperrin@mts.net

Terry MacLeod, Chair, Marketing and Communications
terrymacleod@gmail.com

The Committee to Commemorate the 200th Anniversary of the Selkirk Treaty

Represented Organizations:

Anglican Diocese of Rupert’s Land
Brokenhead Ojibway Nation
City of Winnipeg
City of Selkirk
Hudson’s Bay Company Archives
Kildonan Community Presbyterian Church
Manitoba Historical Society
Manitoba Living History Society
Manitoba Métis Federation
Manitoba Museum
Peguis First Nation
Polish Canadian Congress – Manitoba Branch
Province of Manitoba
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of St. Boniface
Seven Oaks House Museum
The Lord Selkirk Association of Rupert’s Land
The St. Andrew’s Society of Winnipeg
The Scottish Heritage Council of Manitoba
Union nationale métisse Saint-Joseph du Manitoba
Winnipeg Art Gallery
Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

NOTE:  In the summer of 1817, AFTER signing the Treaty, Lord Selkirk designated land on the west side of the Red River for a ‘Protestant’ church and mission, what is now St. John’s Anglican Cathedral, and on the east side of the Red River, near The Forks, for a Roman Catholic church and mission, what is now St. Boniface RC Cathedral.  Both churches were established on land set aside by Treaty fifty-four years before Treaty One was signed at Lower Fort Garry in 1871.

Breaking Through – World Premiere

BREAKING THROUGH

      World Premiere by Sarasvati Productions

#BreakingThrough #Winnipeg #mentalhealth

“After two years of work gathering stories, writing, receiving feedback, rewriting and testing the material we are extremely excited to share the culmination of our Mental Health is Everyone’s Health project with the world premiere of Breaking Through by Hope McIntyre and Cairn Moore.

“The stories of five individuals struggling with mental health issues interweave in this new play. The project saw writers McIntyre and Moore team up with Artists in Health Care, Red Threads Playback Theatre and the Selkirk Mental Health Centre as well as working with multiple community organizations and the public. The resulting play is an exploration of mental illness grounded in real experience.

“We have assembled a stellar artistic team under director Kevin Klassen, including (video/sound). The Winnipeg cast is Elena Anciro, Dorothy Carroll, Richie Diggs, Marsha Knight, Harry Nelken, Spenser Payne and Josh Ranville.”

            ASPER CENTRE FOR THEATRE and FILM

             University of Winnipeg  –  400 Colony Street

                             May 23 – 27 @ 8pm

              May 24 @ 1pm             May 28 @ 2pm

TICKETS:  $15 (seniors and students); $20 (adults), call 204-586-2236

Or contact Judy Wasylycia-Leis by emailing judywl@mts.net

Tom Denton and Hospitality House – Special Dean’s Forum, Sunday, 7 May at 9 a.m.

“A Christian Response to the Refugee Crisis: – a conversation with #TomDenton about the present crisis and the work of Hospitality House Refugee Ministry”.  Sunday, May 7, 9:00 a.m., Mr. Tom Denton, Executive Director, #HospitalityHouse, will be with us to bring us up to date on this critical ministry in which we share. There will be time for questions and conversation.  Please come and join us, and stay for worship after.  All welcome.

#HospitalityHouseRefugeeMinistry (#HHRM) is a non-profit organization, and has for many years been Winnipeg’s leading sponsor of #refugees. Thousands have been sponsored from appalling refugee circumstances, into new hope and productive lives in Canada.

They continue to flood into our city, and while caring families look after many, others must look to the support of Hospitality House to survive their first year here. Several parishes and individual donors have generously supported the work over the years, but the needs continue to be great, because the refugees keep arriving.  Hospitality House, the building, is owned by the Anglican Cathedral Parish of St. John, and is on Cathedral property, beside the Churchyard.  The only other staff person, Karin Gordon, is resident in the House, and does amazing work.  Jay Dyck is our member of the HHRM Board, and an enthusiastic volunteer and supporter.  Thanks, Jay, and also Vic Janzen, for your ongoing energy and commitment!

Requiescat in Pace: Sidney Webber 1923-2017

SIDNEY WEBBER On Thursday, April 13, 2017, Sidney Webber died at Fred Douglas Lodge.  Born July 19, 1923 at the Grace Hospital to parents, Sidney E. Webber and Rosetta Margaret Webber.  Sidney was an only child, spending most of his free time with his family. Sidney grew up in the North End of Winnipeg, residing on Inkster Blvd. as a child and later receiving the home of his parents. His cousin Nancy Webber resides in Victoria, BC. Sidney’s greatest memories as a child were when his Dad worked for CPR and would be given passes to the rail. Every summer his family would vacation to West Minister or English Bay so he could swim in the ocean. Sidney attended Luxton School for grades one to nine, advancing to St. John’s Tech for grade ten and carried on to business College to become an Accountant. He started work in 1942 as an Accountant for Dominion Bronz Company, where he worked for many years until retirement. Sidney loved to golf at the Kildonan Golf Course and was a member of Granada Speed Skating Club for five years and spending many hours in his garden.

Thank you to Fred Douglas Lodge staff at Evergreen as well as Rev. Paul Peters Derry for all your care and support. Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday, April 25 at 10:00 a.m. at St. John’s Cathedral Anglican Church, 135 Anderson Ave. with interment following at St. John’s Cathedral Cemetery.

CROPO FUNERAL CHAPEL 204-586-8044

As published in the Winnipeg Free Press on Apr 22, 2017